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Monday, April 5, 2021

Hinton Hunt Waterloo Pamphlet

 A Good Friend, Terry W. and I shared an afternoon playing some engaging English Civil War miniature battles using a DBA rules variant, but truthfully after a year in quarantine, we spent most of the afternoon drinking wine and just catching up.  Terry was kind enough to share a few odds and ends he had collected over the years, and knowing my interest in Hinton Hunt miniatures, passed on this little Waterloo Pamphlet that Marcus Hinton must have put together to help peddle his wares.  I don't know how common they are, so thought I would just pop up some pictures as a curiosity for those who share my interest.

 







An old man's view of the front yard.  This is the view from some chairs we keep up by the house in the front yard.  I planted all of the flowering trees and cedars about 20-25 years ago when we bought the place. I Planted many of the smaller hardwoods too. A good argument for staying put in one place, and a nice spot to read through Marcus Hinton's words on Waterloo.

 And finally a super quick shot of the Dutch Grenadiers, slowly marching towards completion.

 

Not Hinton Hunt, but these Der Kriegspieler figures, after a lot of tender loving care, are starting to look the part!

The white backpack straps and cross belts are the only major element left to paint.  Then the fun of highlighting and more detailing begins!


16 comments:

  1. Those grenadiers are coming on a treat. I think I can see what might be slowing their advance behind them, namely Conan and sone Testudo Russians.
    I am really envious of the beautiful trees you planted in your front garden, it must give you great pleasure and satisfaction to watch them grow and mature.

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    1. Conan and the Russians are just a canvas for left over paint at this point. What did slow me down was the Franznap camp followers set I just finished. They will provide some much needed humanity to the otherwise martial display. I'll get some good photos of them soon and pop them up on the blog as well. Chomping at the bit in the background are the Bavarian Chevau-Leger, which are now primed and ready!

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  2. Interesting pamphlet , very Old School but charming none the less .

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    1. Not terribly informative, but as you say, quaint in its simplicity.

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  3. Everything you hear and read about Marcus Hinton makes him appear a larger than life character. He was clearly a very talented bloke. Well done with the Dutch grenadiers who must have looked amazing in real life. Well done.

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    1. The more I read and hear about him the more I realize what a character he was. As for the Dutch - no celebrating yet, still a lot of painting to be done on them.

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  4. I do very much like the pose of those DK's and your painting as always is superb!

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    1. I think the original pose of the DK Dutch was best described by Wellington Man as something along the lines of spindly and knock kneed! It was a tremendous amount of work to reposition them. Each front leg was detached from the base, twisted around and given a forward facing bend. Heads were all then re-positioned to look forward, sometimes risking decapitation and necessitating a little super glue to make sure they stayed in their new orientation for the long term. I am however, very pleased with the resulting pose.

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    2. David I must echo David's comment below - that is a truly epic degree of devotion to these old figures. But well worth it - I thought they were pretty nice for DKs now I realise it was all your work!

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    3. Rob, While I do think the figure is much improved I can hardly claim all the credit. These are after all, largely based (stolen) from Marcus Hinton's design!

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  5. Wow! I am always so impressed by your dedication and artistry in “fixing” old minis. To move all those legs and heads! I take my shako off to you. I’m more of a “scrape the mold line and prime ‘em” kind of painter. 😀

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    1. Thanks David. That really is the part that I enjoy most. Since a very early age I loved trying to fix old broken models to make them look new again. I was even known to shoot them with a BB gun so that I would need to "fix" them! There is just something very rewarding about taking these figures to their full potential.

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  6. The 3rd Grenadiers are coming along spectacularly, David. I'm also in awe of the work you've put onto them. They are a lot harder to paint than Hinton Hunts. The pack details, I remember, were particularly difficult because they are so miniscule!

    I love Marcus's pamphlet too. What a brilliant find. He writes rather engagingly I think.

    Best regards
    WM

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    1. Thanks WM. I have to keep up with the Joneses you know! I have been trying to paint and line the backpack straps that are visible under the arms and I have to agree with you - not an easy task by any means. The Waterloo pamphlet was a fun little find. I'm amazed it has survived this long in as good a condition as it is.

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  7. A nice little pamphlet David...
    It’s brief but certainly the sort of thing I would have held on to.
    The Grenadiers look splendid... I am looking forward to seeing the finished unit.

    All the best. Aly

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    1. I'm looking forward to getting the grenadiers off of the painting table! As for the Pamphlet, I was not terribly surprised at it's excellent condition in truth. My friend Terry, who had saved it, is a collector of the first order and very careful with his treasures.

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